Endangered species arrive at Amazonia

It may prove improssible to see an Axolotl in the wild, but you can at Amazonia, and the recent arrival appears very happy its new surroundings.
It may prove improssible to see an Axolotl in the wild, but you can at Amazonia, and the recent arrival appears very happy its new surroundings.

Two of the world’s most endangered species are making themselves at home in Scotland’s indoor rainforest, Amazonia .

The Strathclyde Park attraction has brought in a group of Golden Mantella Frogs and a pair of Axolotl to its ever increasing range of animals.

Both species are currently on the top 10 list of reptiles and amphibians that zoos and aquariums are working to save from extinction.

Golden Mantella Frogs are naturally found in Madagascar but are critically endangered in the wild due to human impact in their distribution area and from being illegally collected as pets.

Axolotls are a species of amphibian, closely related to frogs and toads, naturally found in Lake Xochimilco and Lake Chalco in Mexico.

It’s now thought Axolotls are extinct in the wild due to Lake Chalco being artificially drained to avoid flooding and Lake Xochimilco now mainly exists as canals.

Amanda Golt, zoo manager at Amazonia, said: “We are currently working with other UK zoos in regards to breeding programmes and conserving species.

“Most of our animals are South American, but we feel it’s important to have a variety from other rainforests across the globe to offer an education on the diversity and differences found in different continents.

“The Golden Mantella Frogs are from high altitudes in Madagascar so cannot tolerate the tropical area of Amazonia. We are currently housing them in our handling room and hoping they will breed.”

For information on how to see the new arrivals visit Amazonia’s website