DCSIMG

A reminder of the past

Hiram Sturdys daughter Mary Struthers (left) and Re:Newarthill founder Linda Jane McLean look over some of his work held at North Lanarkshire Heritage Centre in Motherwell.

Hiram Sturdys daughter Mary Struthers (left) and Re:Newarthill founder Linda Jane McLean look over some of his work held at North Lanarkshire Heritage Centre in Motherwell.

The daughter of acclaimed Newarthill artist and writer Hiram Sturdy has given her backing to the group trying to revitalise the village.

Hiram, born in 1889, was a miner on either side of World War One during which he served in the Royal Artillery.

In the 1920s he became a painter and decorator and earned a degree of fame for his memoirs of village life and fighting in the war.

Using his artistic skills he made detailed charcoal drawings to accompany his thoughts.

His work is currently held in North Lanarkshire Heritage Centre, the National Library of Scotland and the Imperial War Museum.

Re:Newarthill founder Linda Jane McLean is currently transcribing his work in order to make it accessible to a new audience.

She said: “I think Hiram was very important to the older people of the village and the younger people I have spoken to are absolutely fascinated by him.

“I am keen to ensure that he is once again better known in the village and that his quality of work is known to a new generation.”

Now in her 90s, Hiram‘s daughter Mary Struthers has lived in the village all her life.

She said: “I remember my father sitting writing all the time, we weren’t allowed in there, but you always peeked in to see what was happening.

“He was one of those people that used up every minute, he loved writing and I think it was very good.

“He never thought he was famous, he was just doing what he wanted to do, but he enjoyed people coming in and looking at his writing and telling them about it.

“He never really spoke about the war, I think it was just enough he survived it, but every so often the Somme or Passendale would get mentioned.

“I suppose he was getting it out of his system through his writing, he couldn’t talk about it, so he wrote it.

Mary helped write seven books on the history of the village and is full of praise for Re:Newarthill.

She said: “I think it is great what they are doing, our group helped keep the history alive and now it is the turn of the next generation.

“The village has changed so much over the years, but anything that rekindles the sense of community that has been lost over the years has to be a good thing.”

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page