Key Fund ends on a high note

Celebrating the achievements are, back, Kenny Moffat, Ellen Archibald and Eric Hislop and, front, Mark Smillie, Jim Dott and Councillor Harry Curran.
Celebrating the achievements are, back, Kenny Moffat, Ellen Archibald and Eric Hislop and, front, Mark Smillie, Jim Dott and Councillor Harry Curran.

The Environment Key Fund which has distributed £2 million in the past ten years is scaling down activities as funding has dried up.

The benefit fund was set up ten years ago to distribute cash which came through landfill tax receipts.

The fund was led by North Lanarkshire Council, Voluntary Action North Lanarkshire, and Central Scotland Green Network Trust and in ten years has distributed nearly £2 million.

Now, with the closure of Auchinlea landfill site near Cleland, funding is restricted and EFK will not be able to respond to grant applications after the end of this financial year.

During the ten years of the fund, more than 70 projects were completed with £1.79 million invested in leisure and recreational facilities, biodiversity projects and financing maintenance and repair of listed buildings, places of worship and historic properties.

Cleland Miners were awarded £30,000 for the refurbishment and upgrade of Cleland Hall, turning a vandalised and derelict hut into a quality and attractive community and sports facility.

The historic Walcker Pipe Organ in Dalziel St Andrew’s Parish Church underwent restoration work with a grant of £30,000 while Motherwell FC Community Trust benefited from a grant of £30,000 to assist with the redevelopment of the community astroturf facility at Fir Park.

There were other awards given to projects throughout the North Lanarkshire area.

Councillor Harry Curran said: “Many communities have benefited from the re-distribution of Landfill tax receipts and the projects have had a tremendously positive impact. I am proud to have been associated with EKF and while, in some ways, I am sorry to see it being scaled back, it is an acknowledgement that the council is having to find better and more imaginative ways of dealing with waste than dumping it in landfills.”