Lights go out for takeaway

Amran Tandoori sign must come down, say planners
Amran Tandoori sign must come down, say planners

A takeaway owner has been ordered to remove an illuminated sign which villagers say makes Bothwell’s conservation area look like Las Vegas.

The “brash and garish” sign at Amran Tandoori is “visually offensive” and out of keeping with the surroundings, according to planners.

Objections were first raised more than two years ago when the Main Street takeaway had a makeover. Since then South Lanarkshire Council planners have been in talks with the owner to discuss a more “suitable” sign, but finally an application for planning permission has been turned down.

One objector told the council: “This brash, garish sign is not acceptable in a conservation village setting. It has an adverse effect on the character and appearance of the village.”

A planning report said Bothwell Community Council had objected to the sign on behalf of angry villagers.

The report stated: “The community council advises it has been approached by residents who are shocked and dismayed that the sign has been installed. Descriptions such as ‘Las Vegas’ and ‘Blackpool Illuminations’ have been used to articulate individuals’ distaste for the design.”

Objectors also claimed South Lanarkshire Council has no consistent policy on the kind of signs allowed and were worried approval for the Amran would set a precedent, but this charge was rejected by the council.

The report added: “Bothwell Conservation Area is a visually attractive and pleasing place. This sign is overly large and out of character with its immediate built environment.

“This is compounded significantly when it is illuminated, resulting in a very prominent and visually offensive and obtrusive form of signage.

“The council has a statutory obligation to preserve and enhance the special character of conservation areas. The sign does not accord with this requirement.”

Planners have met the takeaway owner and his agent in an effort to “agree a more suitable sign”.

The report went on: “Unfortunately, these discussions have proven to be ineffective in persuading the applicant to revise the unauthorised sign.

“The only option now to address the breach of advertising control is to refuse consent on the basis that the sign has a detrimental impact due to its size, scale, design and means of illumination.”