Brothers honour
father with win

Family pride as brothers take top place in Chooselife football tournament (back row) Steven Higgins, Liam Fagan and Craig Murrary; and (front row) brothers Daniel and Sean Fagan.
Family pride as brothers take top place in Chooselife football tournament (back row) Steven Higgins, Liam Fagan and Craig Murrary; and (front row) brothers Daniel and Sean Fagan.
0
Have your say

Three brothers from Holytown honoured their father’s memory at the weekend by winning a special football tournament at Ravenscraig.

Paul Fagan died seven years ago from suicide which left his family distraught.

His three sons Liam, Daniel and Sean decided to form the Paul Fagan team to take part in the Chooselife tournament which was designed to tackle Scotland’s high instance of suicide.

Liam was captain of the team which also included his cousin Steven Higgins and family friend Craig Murray.

The brothers wanted to honour their father and they did him proud.

They lost the first game but were winners of the following five matches.

The brothers were devastated when their father died and Liam said it took some years to come to terms with the loss but now he is able to talk about it.

The football competition was a positive approach to dealing with the bereavement.

Their mother Karen went along to watch her three sons, who all work for Conework Traffic Management.

Scotland’s football community supported the event with representatives of Celtic, Queen of the South, Motherwell, Dundee United, Albion Rovers and Airdrie attending the tournament in aid of National Suicide Prevention Week which highlighted help available to those who need it.

Mark McNally, James Fowler, Scott Leitch, John Rankin, Darren Young and Bryan Prunty joined more than 150 amateur players to kick off the event organised by North Lanarkshire Council in partnership with The Scottish Association for Mental Health (SAMH), NHS Lanarkshire and NL Leisure.

Councillor Sam Love, Convener of Housing and Social Work Services with North Lanarkshire Council, said: “Football is a great way to bring people together and make them feel part of a team. Sport makes a positive difference to people’s mental wellbeing, reduces isolation and promotes a feeling of belonging.

“ChooseLife’s campaign encourages people to talk about suicide and this will help to save lives by reaching out to those thinking about suicide and giving them the help when they need it most.”

Despite the devastating impact of suicide and other mental health problems on families, the subject is often taboo. The aim is to change that by getting people talking, encouraging them to be aware of warning signs and how to get help.